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Know About Normal A1c Levels

Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells. Hemoglobin carries oxygen from the lungs to all body cells.

Like other proteins, hemoglobin can be mixed with sugars, such as glucose. When this happens, A1C or glycohemoglobin (or sometimes HbA1c) becomes glycated hemoglobin.

High levels of glucose in the blood combine with hemoglobin. Once combined, hemoglobin and glucose remain there for red blood cell life – about 4 months. The A1C test measures the amount of glucohomoglobin in your red blood cells.

The A1C test is usually done in a laboratory. Your blood sample will be taken. The blood can be taken at any time of the day. The last meal you ate was fine. It does not matter what blood glucose level is during the test.

WHAT IS NORMAL A1C LEVELS ?

Below 5.7% is normal

Prediabetes – 5.7 to 6.4%

More then 6.4% is chance of type 2 diabetes

WHAT AN A1C TEST CAN DO

Some reports now give the A1C value expressed as a percentage of the average blood glucose value in mg / dl. This is called your approximate average glucose (eAG). (See Calculating your eAG below)

WHEN TO DO THE A1C TEST

The A1C test is usually used to diagnose diabetes at this time. If your A1C is more than 6% or equal during the test, you will be tested for diabetes. Then do the test at least 2-4 times a year.

WHY BLOOD GLUCOSE SELF-EXAMINATION SHOULD CONTINUE

The A1C test to measure your blood glucose level cannot replace your daily checks (blood glucose, self-checks page 19). Self-checks can help you decide how to treat diabetes at that time. Your A1C test results will show you what you can do to keep your blood glucose level within range.

CALCULATING YOUR eAG

A1C (%) —–  eAg(mg/dl)

5 —– 97

5.5 —– 111

6 —– 126

6.5 —– 140

7 —– 154

7.5 —– 169

8 —– 183

8.5 —– 197

9 —– 212

9.5 —– 226

10 —– 240

10.5 —– 255

11 —– 269

11.5 —– 283

12 —– 298

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